Film Jobs

By AM Staff

  • Killer Techniques To Get A Job In The Film Industry!

    Getting a job in the film industry can be very challenging. It is not like other industries, which are based upon how well your resume is written or how well you interview. Industry jobs are very lucrative and highly sought after. This is in part because they can be very rewarding experiences presenting the opportunity for travel, glamour and fame. Although not advertised, most of these positions are secured through social networks, referrals and word of mouth. So being a social butterfly can be to your advantage.

    Most people in the industry are looking to employ dependable, honest and hard working folks. It is not an industry that is conducive to working with newcomers. When money is at stake and people’s reputation on the line, no one wants to try the new gal or guy. In addition, it can be an industry where the turnover rate is very high. Start out first with preparing a good resume one which focuses on your particular expertise. List previous productions you’ve worked on before. If you are just starting out try working on some student projects or intern positions to build your resume. You can get some great resume and interview tips at: www.careerstrategies.blogspot.com

    Next, here are some killer techniques that will help you get your first gig and beyond.

    Develop a social network. These are usually friends and family members working in the industry or know of someone who is working. Keep in contact with them through email and phone calls. If there is a new project or open position they are likely to spread the word. A great way to make these contacts are at industry functions. Go to these events and collect as many email addresses as possible. The next day start emailing the people that you’ve met but DO NOT openly ask if they know of any gigs. Your goal is to develop a rapport so that they trust you. With that trust firmly established they will open up to you regarding important news and events. In recent years the Internet has really exploded with job opportunities. Do a Goggle search for film organizations and chat rooms. Sign up for as many as possible and make it a point to stay in touch with them on an ongoing basis.

    Another technique is to get a list of films about to go into production. The Ross Report and the Hollywood Reporter both carry complete lists. Create interesting looking post cards that highlight your expertise in the field. Send the postcards out to the production manager and also to the production company on a monthly basis. The idea here is to keep your name in the spot light. As I said earlier, the Internet is a really great place to find work. One of the best sites to visit is the Mayor’s Office in your city. When films come to your area they have to file for a permit. The Mayor’s Office then keeps records which they post on their site of available film jobs. Keep in mind not to put too much weight on the job itself rather look at it as a networking opportunity. You may need to take a job that pays nothing in order to make the necessary contacts. If you play your cards right one job can lead to another and so forth. Just make friends with as many people as possible but don’t be intrusive. There are also job boards that specialize in film work. One great thing about them is that they allow you to set up a “job agent”. These virtual agents work by emailing you alerts whenever a new position is posted. You can sign up for one at www.rkacinemasociety.com or www.freecastingcalls.blogspot.com.

    Organizations can be an instrumental tool in your job search efforts. Not only will they invite you to important industry networking events but they can be the key to getting into an internship, mentorship and training program. I would also advise signing up with temp agencies as well. Now there are literally hundreds of agencies out there that specialize in everything from accounting to graphic arts positions. Find an agency that places for entertainment jobs and register with them. The trick here is to call the agency everyday asking if they have work for you. Don’t wait for them to call you rather make yourself available to them. My last bit of advice would be to take the proactive approach. Create a great website and start emailing your URL out. This is part of your marketing campaign. Write interesting blurbs about yourself and the productions you’ve worked on. This will create a buzz about you and your service.

    Now here’s the killer technique that is sure to help you land job after job. On your website create a job board and offer to post open job positions for free. When people start sending you breakdowns you’ll be in for sure. If you do this right you will be the first to get information on new jobs in your area. But to really make this last technique work be sure to share the information with your network. If you scratch their back they’ll be sure to scratch yours by passing along any good gigs to you. Follow these tips and you’ll be getting the steady work you’ve always wanted!

    About The Author

    Ronald K. Armstrong is a noted author, filmmaker and recruiter. He is President of the RKA cinema Society which is an organization dedicated to helping aspiring actors and filmmakers. Mr. Armstrong is also the founder of the revolutionary Kamitic Acting System.

    http://www.rkacinemasociety.com ww.TalentInternet.com 

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